Advanced Technology Group
in the Corporate Strategy Office
PUBLICATIONS

Towards Securing the Internet of Things with QUIC

Lars Eggert, NetApp

This paper is the first to evaluate the feasibility of deploying QUIC, a new UDP-based transport protocol currently undergoing IETF standardization, directly on resource-constrained IoT devices. It quantifies the storage, compute, memory and energy requirements of the Quant QUIC stack on two different IoT platforms, and finds that a minimal standards-compliant QUIC client currently requires approximately 58 to 63KB of flash, around 4KB of stack, and can retrieve 5KB of data in 4.2 to 5.1 s over 0-RTT or 1-RTT connections, using less than 16 KB of heap memory (plus packet buffers), less than 4 KB of stack memory and less than 1.09 J of energy per transaction.



Countering Fragmentation on an Enterprise Storage System

Ram Kesavan, Matthew Curtis-Maury, Vinay Devadas, and Kesari Mishra; NetApp

As a file system ages, it can experience multiple forms of fragmentation. Fragmentation of the free space in the file system can lower write performance and subsequent read performance. Client operations as well as internal operations, such as deduplication, can fragment the layout of an individual file, which also impacts file read performance. File systems that allow sub-block granular addressing can gather intra-block fragmentation, which leads to wasted free space. Similarly, wasted space can also occur when a file system writes a collection of blocks out to object storage as a single large object, because the constituent blocks can become free at different times. The impact of fragmentation also depends on the underlying storage media. This article studies each form of fragmentation in the NetApp® WAFL®file system, and explains how the file system leverages a storage virtualization layer for defragmentation techniques that physically relocate blocks efficiently, including those in read-only snapshots. The article analyzes the effectiveness of these techniques at reducing fragmentation and improving overall performance across various storage media.



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FELLOWSHIPS

Peter Desnoyers, Northeastern University – November 2019

Zoned namespace SSDs: Challenges and Opportunities

Zoned NameSpaces (ZNS) are a mechanism proposed in the NVM Express Workgroup to provide features and functionality similar to that of Open Channel SSD, but fully integrated with the NVMe model using a zone concept similar to that in the ZAC/ZBD extensions for SMR disk. The goals of this research are to investigate applications for ZNS SSD, in particular (a) RAID-like functionality over ZNS SSD, (b) strategies for file system support for ZNS, and (c) interfaces and strategies for direct application usage of ZNS SSD.



Jian Huang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign – October 2018

Hardware-Assisted Secure Flash-Based Storage

Modern storage systems have been developed for decades with the security-critical foundation provided by operating system (OS). However, they are still vulnerable to malware attacks and software defects. Adversaries can obtain the OS kernel privilege or leverage software vulnerabilities to bypass, terminate or destroy current malware detection and defense systems. For instance, encryption ransomware accounts for more than half of all malware attacks today, but current software-based defense systems often fail to enable the victims to say no to ransom collectors. Therefore, it is natural to utilize hardware techniques which have been proven effective in defending against malware attacks.



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